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Skin Infection

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Skin Infection, Pyoderma, Fungal Dermatoses, Parasite infestation, Parasitic Infections of the Skin, Skin and Soft Tissue Infection, SSTI, Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Infection and Infestation

  • Pathophysiology
  • Predisposing factors
  1. Decreased tissue perfusion oxygenation
  2. Peripheral fluid stasis and edema
  3. Increased Skin Trauma risk
  4. Suppressed immune function
  • Types
  • Parasitic Skin Infection
  • Risk Factors
  1. Immunodeficiency
    1. Asplenia
    2. Diabetes Mellitus (5 fold increased SSTI risk)
    3. HIV Infection
    4. Chemotherapy
    5. DMARDs (Rheumatoid Arthritis)
  2. Chronic Disease
    1. Comorbidity (e.g. cardiopulmonary, hepatorenal, debility)
    2. Dialysis (ESRD)
    3. Longterm intravascular access (MRSA risk)
    4. Lymphedema
    5. Obesity
    6. Peripheral Neuropathy
    7. Peripheral artery disease
    8. Trauma or surgery
    9. Eczema and other Pruritic Conditions
  3. Demographics
    1. Children and older adults (MRSA risk)
    2. Healthcare Worker
    3. Prolonged hospitalization (MRSA risk)
    4. Longterm care (MRSA risk)
    5. Military (close quarters)
    6. Athlete
  4. Lifestyle
    1. Alcohol Abuse
    2. Nutritional deficiency
    3. IV Drug Abuse
    4. Water exposure (swimming in lakes, hot tubs)
  • Classification
  1. Class 1
    1. Simple infection without systemic symptoms or signs of spread
    2. No uncontrolled comorbidities impacting treatment
    3. Outpatient antibiotic management planned
  2. Class 2
    1. Infection with systemic symptoms or signs of spread (e.g. fever, sweats, Tachycardia) or
    2. Uncontrolled comorbidities impacting treatment or
    3. Parenteral antibiotics required
  3. Class 3
    1. Infection with systemic symptoms or signs of spread (e.g. fever, sweats, Tachycardia) or
    2. Uncontrolled comorbidities impacting treatment
    3. Inpatient parenteral antibiotics required
  4. Class 4
    1. Infection with life-threatening systemic symptoms or signs of spread (e.g. severe Sepsis)
    2. Inpatient management with parenteral antibiotics (may require ICU care)
    3. Surgical Consultation may be warranted