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Ambulatory Assistive Device

Aka: Ambulatory Assistive Device, Ambulatory Device, Mobility Device, Mobility Aid, Walking Aid, Ambulation Device
  1. See Also
    1. Assistive Technology
    2. Canes
    3. Crutches
    4. Walkers
    5. Wheelchair
  2. Epidemiology
    1. More than 25% of those over age 65 years use an Ambulatory Assistive Device either at home or out of the home
  3. Background
    1. Mobility Assistive Devices are Durable Medical Equipment
      1. Up to 80% of cost is covered under Medicare Part B (after deductible)
      2. Medically necessary as prescribed by a physician for use within the home
    2. Proper fit and use is important
      1. Consult physical therapy, occupational therapy or Orthotics
  4. Indications
    1. Gait disturbance
    2. Deconditioning and generalized weakness
    3. Weak, painful or immobilized leg
    4. Fall Prevention
    5. Maintain Activities of Daily Living
    6. Aid independence and less need for Caregiver assistance
  5. Types: Available Mobility Devices
    1. Canes
      1. Standard Cane
      2. Offset Cane
      3. Multi-Leg Cane (Quad Cane)
      4. Walk Cane (Hemi-Walker)
    2. Crutches
      1. Axillary Crutches
      2. Forearm Crutches
    3. Walkers
      1. Standard Walker
      2. Front Wheeled Walker
      3. Four Wheeled Walker (Rollator)
    4. Wheelchair
      1. Manual Wheelchair
      2. Scooter
      3. Power Wheelchair
  6. Management: Mobility Device selection in elderly
    1. Patient needs only 1 hand on Ambulatory Device to maintain weight bearing and balance
      1. Patient needs weight bearing assistance
        1. Occasional or Intermittent use: Offset Cane
        2. Frequent use: Quadripod Cane (Quad Cane)
        3. Continuous use: Hemi-Walker
      2. Patient needs device only for balance
        1. Standard Cane
    2. Patient needs 2 hands on Ambulatory Device to maintain weight bearing and balance
      1. Patient needs weight bearing assistance
        1. Intermittent or Occasional use
          1. Two Wheeled Walker (Front-Wheeled Walker)
          2. Standard Walker
        2. Frequent use
          1. Two Wheeled Walker (Front-Wheeled Walker)
          2. Forearm Crutches
        3. Continuous use
          1. Two Wheeled Walker (Front-Wheeled Walker)
          2. Standard Walker
      2. Patient needs device only for balance
        1. Four-Wheeled Walker (Rollator)
    3. Patient unable to use an Ambulatory Device (e.g. cane, walker)
      1. Adequate upper body strength to power a Manual Wheelchair
        1. Manual Wheelchair
      2. Strength and postural balance to use a scooter
        1. Scooter
      3. Unable to manually power a Wheelchair or to use a scooter
        1. Power Wheelchair
  7. References
    1. Bradley (2011) Am Fam Physician 84(4): 405-11 [PubMed]
    2. Sehgal (2021) Am Fam Physician 103(12): 737-44 [PubMed]
    3. Van Hook (2003) Am Fam Physician 67(8):1717-24 [PubMed]

Ambulation device (C0336608)

Concepts Manufactured Object (T073)
SnomedCT 42305009
English ambulation devices, ambulation devices (treatment), Ambulation devices, Ambulation device, Ambulation device (physical object), Ambulation device, NOS
Spanish dispositivo para ambulación (objeto físico), dispositivo para ambulación, dispositivo para deambulación
Sources
Derived from the NIH UMLS (Unified Medical Language System)


Walking aid (C0557834)

Concepts Medical Device (T074)
SnomedCT 224899006
LNC LP125109-1, MTHU040346
English aids walking, walking aid, Aids for the walk, Walking aid, Walking aid (physical object)
Spanish apoyos para la marcha (objeto físico), apoyos para la marcha
Sources
Derived from the NIH UMLS (Unified Medical Language System)


Mobility aid (C3495449)

Definition (MEDLINEPLUS)

Mobility aids help you walk or move from place to place if you are disabled or have an injury. They include

  • Crutches
  • Canes
  • Walkers
  • Wheelchairs
  • Motorized scooters

You may need a walker or cane if you are at risk of falling. If you need to keep your body weight off your foot, ankle or knee, you may need crutches. You may need a wheelchair or a scooter if an injury or disease has left you unable to walk.

Choosing these devices takes time and research. You should be fitted for crutches, canes and walkers. If they fit, these devices give you support, but if they don't fit, they can be uncomfortable and unsafe.

Concepts Medical Device (T074)
SnomedCT 183135000, 151410003
LNC LP136322-7, MTHU042378
English Mobility aids, Mobility aid (physical object), mobility aids, aid mobility, transport, transports, Mobility Aids, Mobility aid, Mobility aids (physical object), Locomotory aid, Equipment to aid mobility
Spanish equipamiento para ayuda locomotriz (objeto físico), equipamiento para ayuda locomotriz
Sources
Derived from the NIH UMLS (Unified Medical Language System)


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