Geriatric Medicine Book

Caregiver

  • Caregiver

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Caregiver

Aka: Caregiver, Caregiver Support, Caregiver Burden
  1. See Also
    1. Caregiver Resources
    2. Caregiver Burden Scale
    3. Health Concerns in the Elderly
    4. Advance Care Planning
    5. Activities of Daily Living
    6. Instrumental Activities of Daily Living
  2. Definitions
    1. Caregiver
      1. Family or friend who offers unpaid assistance to a person with chronic or disabling condition
  3. Epidemiology
    1. Of those adults requiring longterm care, 80% live in the community
      1. Unpaid Caregivers provide 90% of the care for these patients (nearly 25 hours/week on average)
      2. Nearly all require assistance in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living
      3. Nearly 60% require assistance in Activities of Daily Living
      4. More than half were hospitalized in the last 12 months
      5. https://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/ppi/2015/caregiving-in-the-united-states-2015-report-revised.pdf
  4. Mechanism: Caregiver Burden
    1. Caregiving has benefits of personal satisfaction, feeling useful and needed, and finding purpose and meaning in life
    2. However, caregiving also is associated with significant persistent, uncontrollable and unpredictable stressors
      1. Comprises physical, psychological and financial burdens (one third of Caregivers rate the burden as high)
      2. Caregivers are more likely to miss work and have reduced work hours with loss of salary and benefits
      3. Caregivers have higher rates of Major Depression, emotional stress, Insomnia and serious illness
      4. Caregivers report neglecting health habits and self-care, and less time for other family and friends
  5. Evaluation: Caregiver
    1. See Caregiver Burden Scale
    2. Caregiver Assessment via Guided Care Model
      1. https://www.caregiver.org/caregivers-count-too-section-3-what-should-family-caregiver-assessments-include
    3. Modified Caregiver Strain Index
      1. https://consultgeri.org/try-this/general-assessment/issue-14.pdf
    4. Adapted Zaret Burden Interview
      1. Bedard (2001) Gerontologist 41(5): 652–7 +PMID:11574710 [PubMed]
  6. Management: General
    1. Caregiver well-being
      1. Take a break from caregiving
      2. Support group
      3. Pursue own interests (e.g. hobbies)
      4. Maintain own health including healthy lifestyle
      5. Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
    2. Caregiver education
      1. Caregiver training for medical tasks
      2. AARP Prepare to Care: A Caregiving Planning Guide for Families
        1. https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/prepare-to-care-planning-guide/
    3. Referrals
      1. Elder agencies in local area
      2. Home health services
      3. Adult day programs
      4. Meal delivery services
    4. General patient management
      1. Early Palliative Care
      2. Advance Care Planning
      3. Improve quality of life with symptom management
      4. Address ways to unburden the Caregiver in specific conditions (e.g. Dementia, cancer, stroke)
  7. Resources
    1. See Caregiver Reources
  8. References
    1. Swartz (2019) Am Fam Physician 99(11): 699-706 [PubMed]

Caregiver (C0085537)

Definition (MSH) Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.
Definition (MEDLINEPLUS)

Caregivers provide help to another person in need. The person receiving care may be an adult - often a parent or a spouse - or a child with special medical needs. Some caregivers are family members. Others are paid. They do many things:

  • Shop for food and cook
  • Clean the house
  • Pay bills
  • Give medicine
  • Help the person go to the toilet, bathe and dress
  • Help the person eat
  • Provide company and emotional support

Caregiving is hard, and caregivers of chronically ill people often feel stress. They are "on call" 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. If you're caring for someone with mental problems like Alzheimer's disease it can be especially difficult. Support groups can help.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

Definition (NCI) The primary person in charge of the care of a patient, usually a family member or a designated health care professional.
Definition (NCI_NCI-GLOSS) A person who gives care to people who need help taking care of themselves. Examples include children, the elderly, or patients who have chronic illnesses or are disabled. Caregivers may be health professionals, family members, friends, social workers, or members of the clergy. They may give care at home or in a hospital or other health care setting.
Definition (NCI_CDISC) The primary person in charge of the care of a patient, usually a family member or a designated health care professional. (NCI)
Definition (PSY) Family members, professionals, or paraprofessionals who provide care to children or to the mentally or physically disabled.
Definition (CSP) any individual who provides care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability; they may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution; although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept usually refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, etc.; this term includes the concept of caregiver burden.
Definition (HL7V3.0) <p>A person responsible for the primary care of a patient at home.</p>
Concepts Professional or Occupational Group (T097)
MSH D017028
SnomedCT 133932002
HL7 CAREGIVER
LNC LP76010-5
English Care Giver, Care Givers, Caregivers, caregiver, caregiver (history), Carer, Carers, care giver, caregiver person, care givers, caregivers, CAREGIVER, Caregiver (person), Caregiver
Italian Persona che presta le cure, Persone che forniscono assistenza
Swedish Vårdgivare
Japanese カイゴシャ, 介護者
Czech osoby pečující o pacienty, Poskytovatel péče
Finnish Omaishoitajat
Russian POMOSHCH' OKAZYVAIUSHCHIE LITSA, SEM'I CHLENY, OKAZYVAIUSHCHIE POMOSHCH', SUPRUGI, OKAZYVAIUSHCHIE POMOSHCH', ПОМОЩЬ ОКАЗЫВАЮЩИЕ ЛИЦА, СЕМЬИ ЧЛЕНЫ, ОКАЗЫВАЮЩИЕ ПОМОЩЬ, СУПРУГИ, ОКАЗЫВАЮЩИЕ ПОМОЩЬ
French Aidants, Soignants, Soignant
Croatian HRANITELJSTVO
Polish Opiekunowie chorych, Współmałżonkowie-opiekunowie chorych, Członkowie rodziny-opiekunowie chorych
Hungarian Gondviselő
Norwegian Omsorgspersoner
Spanish Cuidadores de Familia, proveedor de atención y cuidados vinculados con la salud (persona), proveedor de atención y cuidados vinculados con la salud, Cuidador, Cuidadores
Portuguese Prestador de cuidados, Cuidadores
Dutch zorgverlener, Verzorger/verzorgster, Verzorgers/verzorgsters
German Pfleger, Pflegepersonen
Sources
Derived from the NIH UMLS (Unified Medical Language System)


Caregiver support (regime/therapy) (C0150162)

Definition (NIC) Provision of the necessary information, advocacy, and support to facilitate primary patient care by someone other than a health care professional
Definition (ALT) Using a qualified helper to assist with a patient's care. Service is billed in 15-minute increments.
Concepts Therapeutic or Preventive Procedure (T061)
SnomedCT 386229000
English Caregiver Support, Caregiver support each 15 minutes, crgvr suprt, Caregiver support (regime/therapy), caregiver support, Supporting Caregiver, Caregiver support
Spanish apoyo de administrador de atención (régimen/tratamiento), apoyo de administrador de atención
Sources
Derived from the NIH UMLS (Unified Medical Language System)


caregiver burden (C0870252)

Definition (PSY) Used primarily for family or nonprofessional caregivers and the stress or associated emotional responses experienced when caring for the mentally or physically disabled. Consider OCCUPATIONAL STRESS for professional caregivers, e.g., health care personnel.
Concepts Qualitative Concept (T080)
English burden caregiver, burden caregivers, caregiver burden, Caregiver Burden
Sources
Derived from the NIH UMLS (Unified Medical Language System)


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